Eating Once A Day To Lose Weight Is Counterproductive Says Weight Loss Doc

Fat-Me-Not: Weight Loss Diet Of The Future

As I said in my book, eating once a day is not going to give your stomach the good workout it needs. You’re not maximizing your calorie spending for the best weight-loss result, which is what happens when you eat smaller meals 4-5 times per day.

Internal medicine and Obesity Medicine specialist Dr. Myo Nwe of the Ace Medical Weight Loss Center in South Carolina is speaking out against renewed interest in so-called once-a-day diets that allow for only one meal per 24-hour period. Dr. Nwe previously covered the topic in her own weight loss guide Fat Me Not, where she actually encourages diets to eat several smaller meals throughout the day.

More and more websites are again actively pushing this once-a-day diet, Dr. Nwe explains. And it might sound logical at first, but you have to remember that your body is a machine. It needs to run on certain patterns, and one of them is getting periodic nutrition throughout the waking day. In Chapter 3 of her book, Dr. Nwe breaks down the scientific contradictions that many popular diets consciously ignore, including once-a-day diets. Understanding the body’s digestive process is key to maximizing weight loss, she says, not trying to trick the body with gimmicks.

Two negative things occur when you limit yourself to just one meal per day, Dr. Nwe continues.

  • The first is your body enters starvation mode, as quickly as 4 hours after your last meal. This means the body begins storing part of the fat rather than burning it away. So thats counterproductive.
  • The second is your body burns a considerable amount of calories throughout the day just from regularly, healthy digestion.

If you only feed it once a day, the stomach just sits there and growls – and ultimately you burn less calories overall than you normally would. Websites and blogs like Fitmole and Hubbys Home have recommended the diet to their followers, as have dozens of popular health sites around the globe. The renewed interest in this purportedly fast and easy diet has been most apparent among young men, especially weight lifting enthusiasts.

Dr. Nwe says she’s surprised that people so devoted to fitness would overlook the science involved. As I said in my book, eating once a day is not going to give your stomach the good workout it needs. Youre not maximizing your calorie spending for the best weight-loss result, which is what happens when you eat smaller meals 4-5 times per day. Again, the body is a machine, and dieters should want to maximize the bodys own calorie-burning capacity.

Dr. Nwe is an internal medicine specialist practicing in both North and South Carolina, where she co-founded the Ace Medical Weight Loss Center in Rock Hill with Dr. Sandeep Grewal, also an internal medicine specialist.

Snacking Between Meals That Help You Gain or Lose Weight

Its a nice little break in your day. Its something to help pass the time while you watch TV. Each of these answers is part of the snacking habits of average Americans for better or for worse.

Research has identified two major types of snackers: Individuals who snack several times a day in response to true hunger. This type of snacking, which likely happens at regular times, allows adjustment of food intake from day to day, depending on the body needs. These snackers tend to be younger, healthy and lean. Individuals who choose snacks high in salt, sugar or fat and tend to snack at irregular times in response to environmental stimuli not because of hunger.

Snacking while watching TV is common. This type of snacking is not in response to the bodys needs, so it tends to lead to weight gain and poor nutrition. According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), in the early 1970s, the average man got 502 of his daily calories from snacks, the average woman got 296. Jump forward 40 years, and those numbers increase to 634 calories for men and 438 for women.

Today, fewer Americans eat three meals a day, but most of us snack. In fact, 2 of 3 Americans eat two or more snacks each day. We get about 23 percent of our calories from snacks twice the average calories eaten at breakfast and about the same as the average lunch calories.

When are we doing this snacking? If you tend to eat both lunch and dinner, theres a 2 in 3 chance that you eat a snack in between, and a similar chance that you eat a snack between dinner and bedtime.

Low-Cal Diets Make You Gain Weight

Low-Cal Diets May Make You?Gain?Weight

If losing weight feels like a never-ending battle, new research may explain why: Diets that restrict calories can actually make it harder to lose weight and keep it off.

Cutting calories increases production of cortisol, the?stress?hormone, which is linked to added belly fat, a new study finds.?”For the first time in humans, we are finding out that cutting your calories increases cortisol,” said lead researcher A. Janet Tomiyama, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at the University of California, San Francisco.

“We think this may be one reason dieters tend to have a hard time keeping weight off in the long-term,” she said.?People who count calories feel stressed, she said, but it’s the reduction in calories that increases cortisol, which, in turn, stresses the body and leads to weight retention.

“No matter how you cut calories, whether that’s doing it on your own, or doing something like Nutrisystem or Jenny Craig, it doesn’t matter, it’s still going to increase your cortisol level,” she said.?At any given time, 47% of U.S. adults are dieting, but up to 64% gain back more weight than they lost, according to background information in the report published online April 6 in?Psychosomatic Medicine.

For the study, Tomiyama’s team randomly assigned 121 women to one of four diets. One group tracked their calories, keeping them to 1,200 a day; another group ate normally but recorded the number of calories they consumed; a third group ate 1,200 calories a day, but did not have to record them, and the fourth group ate normally without any calorie-tracking.

At the start and end of the three-week trial, the researchers measured each woman’s cortisol and stress levels. When calories were restricted, cortisol levels increased. In addition, calorie-counting also increased the women’s perceived stress, the researchers found.

“The term ‘dieting’ brings to mind deprivation, starvation, being miserable and uncomfortable and ultimately failing in?weight loss?efforts,” Samantha Heller, a dietitian, nutritionist and?exercise?physiologist who is familiar with the study, said.

Burning more calories than you consume is how your body loses weight, she said. “However, severe calorie restriction, diet fads, pills and potions, detox cleanses and other quacky approaches to weight loss only contribute to people’s diet failures and, in fact, may increase the likelihood of regaining even more weight than what was lost — if any,” Heller added.

The best way to drop unwanted pounds is to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors that include eating a variety of healthy foods, physical activity, patience and a game plan, she said.

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