What Is Intermittent Fasting And Is It Actually Good For You?

Sustainable weight loss. Protection from diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Improved brain health. Enhanced physical fitness and strength. It seems like every week, researchers turn up some new and profound benefit associated with intermittent fasting: eating schedules that incorporate regular periods of low or no food consumption.

By eating normally for several days a week and eating much less on the others, a person may be able to shift her body’s cellular and metabolic processes in ways that promote optimal health. And experts who study intermittent fasting say that while many blanks still need to be filled in, some of the positive health effects of intermittent fasting are no longer in doubt.

There continues to be good evidence that intermittent fasting is producing weight-loss benefits, and we also have some evidence that these diets can reduce inflammation, they can reduce blood pressure and resting heart rate, and they seem to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system.

Benjamin Horne, director of cardiovascular and genetic epidemiology at Utah’s non-profit Intermountain Healthcare system.

Home has published research on the effects of intermittent fasting. “[Intermittent fasting] is something that is moving into practice in the medical field, and it’s a reasonable approach for people who don’t like daily restriction of their calories.

Intermittent fasting is a good option for weight loss for overweight and obese people.

Michelle Harvie, a research dietitian with the Prevent Breast Cancer unit at the Manchester Breast Centre in the UK.

Harvie has co-authored several studies on intermittent fasting, and her research has repeatedly shown that it outperforms traditional diets in terms of weight loss, reduced body fat and improved insulin resistance. She’s also found some evidence that intermittent fasting may beat traditional weight-loss plans when it comes to lowering a woman’s risk for breast cancer, and that, at least in rodents, fasting plans may disrupt or counteract the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

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